Seniority vs. Quality

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Seniority vs. Quality

Natalie Bukovec, Staff Writer

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Last Friday, the freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors presented their floats in the annual homecoming parade. The theme of this year’s homecoming was “on the wild side”; therefore, all grades based their floats on the jungle except for the juniors whose theme was Tarzan. At the end of the night, when the winner was finally announced, the whole school found out that, yet again, the seniors won.

“This year, I thought that the freshmen did a very good job,” said principal Mr. Fetchik, “I actually voted for them.” As opposed to usually following up the rear, the freshmen class this year impressively had a detailedly designed float as well as a DJ. The sophomore float was also very well decorated with a treehouse and many students dressed up in animal costumes. The juniors demonstrated Tarzan very well with a large homemade “tree of life”, various plants, a student in a gorilla suit, and many real vines. The seniors had a tree that had real branches, and a few animal balloons. “Although, the senior float had a real looking tree, their float, as compared to the others, definitely should not have won,” said junior Nicole Kreuz, “It looked like they just picked up branches on their ride around the school.”

Many underclassmen students are starting to believe that the seniors are winning solely due to the fact that they are seniors rather than having a good quality float. Isabella Baker believes that, “they wouldn’t even have to show up, and they’d still win.” Even Mr. Fetchik thinks the senior float has not always been the most worthy to win; however, he says that last year’s seniors did deserve the victory due to the presence of a camel. Therefore, even though, to the underclassmen, it seems that the whole competition is rigged, it may not always revolve around seniority.

Mr. Fetchik, principle of seven years, believes that he can recall a time when a class won the float contest as freshmen, then again as sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Many impartial adults are involved in the voting process including both staff and board members; so, unless the seniors bribe the voters, voting must be fair. Furthermore, this biased thought on seniority may not entirely be true. However, the idea that it may factor in to the standings in some way is entirely a possibility.

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